Share
twitterlinkedinfacebook
Image 1 of 1
spx_wildlife_app_14183_008.jpg
**ALL ROUND PICTURES FROM SOLARPIX.COM**                                             **NO UK NEWSPAPER PUBLICATION**.**UK MAGAZINE & SUPPLEMENT PUBLICATION ONLY** AND NO PUBLICATION IN AUSTRALIA, BELGIUM, FRANCE, GERMANY, ITALY, SCANDINAVIA AND USA**                                                                                  Wild animals living in unexplored forests are being captured on hidden cameras for a unique experimental iPhone app..Launching today (November 14th), the Zoological Society of London’s (ZSL) Instant WILD app hopes to revolutionise the way conservationists monitor remote wildlife hotspots around the world..Motion sensitive cameras have already been set up by forest clearings, watering holes and plains in Kenya , Sri Lanka and Mongolia ..Images triggered by wild animals walking past are sent straight to the app in real-time.- meaning users can get a rare glimpse into the lives of lions, elephants or wild dogs on their commute home..The new technology will save field workers hours of vital time by asking iPhone users to help identify species from live camera trap photographs..By recruiting thousands of ‘citizen scientists’ to assist with wildlife identification, ZSL conservationists hope users of the free app will alert them to images containing possible new species within minutes of them being taken..Traditionally it could take one conservationist days to sort through photographs from a camera in order to log information from the pictures..Now with the public’s help these images will be sorted into species groups allowing conservationists to analyse the data much faster than ever before. This will help them determine whether threatened animal populations are increasing or decreasing and react quickly to unidentified species..ZSL’s conservation director Professor Jonathan Baillie says: “Seeing a herd of elephants crossing the path of a hidden camera on the other side of the world is an amazing privilege. Now we can share that amazi